Toggle menu

Minimal Unit Pricing Study (MUP)

Start date:
Febuary 2018
End date:
March 2019
Co-ordinated by:
Miranda Odam
Main trial site:
RIE

The Scottish Parliament passed legislation in 2012, known as the Alcohol (Minimum Pricing) (Scotland) Act 2012, which allowed the introduction of a system of Minimum Unit Pricing for alcohol.

Minimum unit pricing sets a ‘floor price’ for a unit of alcohol, now 50p per unit as of 1st May 2018, meaning it can’t be sold for lower than that. The aim of the MUP legislation, according to the Scottish Government, is to reduce the effects of harmful alcohol consumption, and improve the health and wellbeing of Scotland’s population.

We are conducting a study, funded by the NIHR and led by the University of Glasgow, to measure the effect of minimum unit pricing in emergency care settings.

For further information on minimum unit pricing,

For further information on this study please refer to the University of Glasgow website

 

Chief Investigator

Michele Open

Consultant Emergency Medicine

Research Team

Dr Adam Lloyd

Honorary Research Fellow & Lecturer

Alison Williams

Senior Research Nurse

Allan MacRaild

Stroke Lead Research Nurse

Julia Grahamslaw

Lead Research Nurse

Rachel O'Brien

Lead Research Nurse

Caroline Blackstock

AMU Senior Research Nurse

Rachel O'Brien

Lead Research Nurse

Polly Black

Senior Research Nurse

Liz Hasseld

RRG Research Assistant

Emma Moatt

Research Project Manager

Miranda Odam

Research Nurse Manager

More EMERGE Trials

ISARIC4C – Coronavirus Clinical Characterisation Consortium, an observational study

ISARIC/WHO Clinical Characterisation Protocol for Severe Emerging Infections in the UK (CCP-UK)

People who develop an Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) often have a poor prognosis and many go on to develop chronic kidney disease (CKD). The recognition that AKI and CKD are linked is recent and the molecular pathways that control the transition from acute injury to chronic disease are not well defined. Currently there are no specific treatments that reduce the risk of progressing to CKD after AKI.

Preliminary investigations (not yet published) suggest that AKI causes sustained activation of the endothelin (ET) system to the long-term detriment of renal and systemic haemodynamic function. These pilot data form the basis of our project that seeks to determine whether the ET system is active in patients with AKI and, thus, represents a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

KRAKIL aims to recruit altogether 100 patients from across the emergency department, acute medical unit and inpatient wards at the Royal Infirmary. 50 of which with AKI’s and 50 matched controls with normal kidney function. We will monitor their bloods and urine for 90 days and compare the data from between the two groups.

Read more

KRAKIL Study

DASH Trial

DASH is a randomised clinical trial investigating a treatment to reverse the effects of blood-thinning medications.