Toggle menu

ATTEST2 Trial

Start date:
July 2017
End date:
January 2021
Co-ordinated by:
The Stroke Research Team
Main trial site:
NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

ATTEST 2 aims to test tenecteplase in a large clinical trial to establish whether it is a better drug than alteplase for use in thrombolysis. This will involve a large number of hospitals in the UK, and possibly overseas. People who are considered suitable for thrombolysis will be allocated at random to receive either the current standard treatment with alteplase, or tenecteplase, and will be followed up for the first 90 days to measure the effects on recovery.
Even if there are no significant differences between between the two drugs, tenecteplase is less expensive and much easier to give to patients than alteplase, needing a single injection only. Alteplase has to be given as an injection followed by a longer injection over an hour. This advantage of tenecteplase alone would have worthwhile benefits to the patient.

Trial Design
Prospective Randomised Open, Blinded End-point (PROBE) – Phase III

Principal Investigator
Dr. Will Whitely, Stroke Medicine, University of Edinburgh & NHS Lothian

Chief Investigator

Dr William Whitely

Scottish Senior Clinical Fellow and Consultant Neurologist

Local PI

Dr Matt Reed

Director of EMERGE, Consultant, NRS Career Research Fellow & Honorary Reader in Emergency Medicine

Research Team

Rachel O'Brien

Lead Research Nurse

Allan MacRaild

Stroke Lead Research Nurse

Polly Black

Senior Research Nurse

Caroline Blackstock

AMU Senior Research Nurse

Alison Williams

Senior Research Nurse

Fiona McCurrach

Senior Research Nurse

Seona Burgess

Senior Stroke Research Nurse

Jessica Teasdale

Senior Research Nurse - Stroke/Neurosurgery

Michelle Curtin

Senior Research Nurse - Stroke/Neurosurgery

Fiona McCurrach

Senior Research Nurse

More EMERGE Trials

People who develop an Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) often have a poor prognosis and many go on to develop chronic kidney disease (CKD). The recognition that AKI and CKD are linked is recent and the molecular pathways that control the transition from acute injury to chronic disease are not well defined. Currently there are no specific treatments that reduce the risk of progressing to CKD after AKI.

Preliminary investigations (not yet published) suggest that AKI causes sustained activation of the endothelin (ET) system to the long-term detriment of renal and systemic haemodynamic function. These pilot data form the basis of our project that seeks to determine whether the ET system is active in patients with AKI and, thus, represents a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

KRAKIL aims to recruit altogether 100 patients from across the emergency department, acute medical unit and inpatient wards at the Royal Infirmary. 50 of which with AKI’s and 50 matched controls with normal kidney function. We will monitor their bloods and urine for 90 days and compare the data from between the two groups.

Read more

KRAKIL Study

Identification and characterization of the clinical toxicology of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) by laboratory analysis of biological samples from recreational drug users.

Read more

IONA Study

Identification of Novel Psychoactive Substances (IONA)

DASH Trial

DASH is a randomised clinical trial investigating a treatment to reverse the effects of blood-thinning medications.